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Estimating Heart Rate, Energy Expenditure, and Physical Performance With a Wrist Photoplethysmographic Device During Running

Estimating Heart Rate, Energy Expenditure, and Physical Performance With a Wrist Photoplethysmographic Device During Running

HR was monitored with an optical wrist worn heart rate monitor (Pulse On, Espoo, Finland) and GPS data with a mobile phone (Samsung S3 Galaxy Trend).

Jakub Parak, Maria Uuskoski, Jan Machek, Ilkka Korhonen

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2017;5(7):e97


Acute Effect of Alcohol Intake on Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation During the First Hours of Sleep in a Large Real-World Sample of Finnish Employees: Observational Study

Acute Effect of Alcohol Intake on Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation During the First Hours of Sleep in a Large Real-World Sample of Finnish Employees: Observational Study

Heart rate variability (HRV) is a widely used marker of cardiac autonomic regulation reflecting fluctuations in R-R intervals in short or extended time recordings [8] and is modulated by respiration, central vasoregulatory centers, peripheral baroreflex loops

Julia Pietilä, Elina Helander, Ilkka Korhonen, Tero Myllymäki, Urho M Kujala, Harri Lindholm

JMIR Ment Health 2018;5(1):e23


Fitbit Charge HR Wireless Heart Rate Monitor: Validation Study Conducted Under Free-Living Conditions

Fitbit Charge HR Wireless Heart Rate Monitor: Validation Study Conducted Under Free-Living Conditions

In principle, heart rate measures should offer a number of advantages in activity tracking. First, heart rate monitors outperform accelerometers in capturing non–weight-bearing activities such as cycling and rowing.

Alexander Wilhelm Gorny, Seaw Jia Liew, Chuen Seng Tan, Falk Müller-Riemenschneider

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2017;5(10):e157


Clinical Validation of Heart Rate Apps: Mixed-Methods Evaluation Study

Clinical Validation of Heart Rate Apps: Mixed-Methods Evaluation Study

Recently, smartphones have started to be used for medical purposes to measure numerous vital parameters such as heart rate (HR) and body temperature. This enables the use of a smartphone as a wireless HR monitor [3].

Thijs Vandenberk, Jelle Stans, Christophe Mortelmans, Ruth Van Haelst, Gertjan Van Schelvergem, Caroline Pelckmans, Christophe JP Smeets, Dorien Lanssens, Hélène De Cannière, Valerie Storms, Inge M Thijs, Bert Vaes, Pieter M Vandervoort

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2017;5(8):e129