JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 4.77

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor: 4.77) is a leading peer-reviewed journal and one of the flagship journals of JMIR Publications. JMIR mHealth and uHealth has published since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal indexed in PubMed. In June 2021, JMU received an impact factor of 4.77.

JMU has a focus on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics. It has a broad scope that includes papers which are more technical or more formative/developmental than what would be published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

JMIR mHealth and uHealth adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs (ready for deposit in PubMed Central/PubMed).

Recent Articles

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Augmented Reality (incl. Google Glass) Applications

Guidelines provide instructions for diagnostics and therapy in modern medicine. Various mobile devices are used to represent the potential complex decision trees. An example of time-critical decisions is triage in case of a mass casualty incident.

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Quality Evaluation and Descriptive Analysis/Reviews of Multiple Existing Mobile Apps

Prenatal genetic testing is an essential part of routine prenatal care. Yet, obstetricians often lack the time to provide comprehensive prenatal genetic testing education to their patients. Pregnant women lack prenatal genetic testing knowledge, which may hinder informed decision-making during their pregnancies. Due to the rapid growth of technology, mobile apps are a potentially valuable educational tool through which pregnant women can learn about prenatal genetic testing and improve the quality of their communication with obstetricians. The characteristics, quality, and number of available apps containing prenatal genetic testing information are, however, unknown.

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mHealth in the Developing World/LMICs, Underserved Communities, and for Global Health

There is a rapid uptake of mobile-enabled technologies in lower- and upper-middle–income countries because of its portability, ability to reduce mobility, and facilitation of communication. However, there is limited empirical evidence on the usefulness of mobile health (mHealth) information and communication technologies (ICTs) to address constraints associated with the work activities of health care professionals at points of care in hospital settings.

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Evaluation and Research Methodology for mHealth

In recent years, there has been rapid growth in the availability and use of mobile health (mHealth) apps around the world. A consensus regarding an accepted standard to assess the quality of such apps has yet to be reached. A factor that exacerbates the challenge of mHealth app quality assessment is variations in the interpretation of quality and its subdimensions. Consequently, it has become increasingly difficult for health care professionals worldwide to distinguish apps of high quality from those of lower quality. This exposes both patients and health care professionals to unnecessary risks. Despite progress, limited understanding of the contributions of researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) exists on this topic. Furthermore, the applicability of quality assessment methodologies in LMIC settings remains relatively unexplored.

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mHealth for Health Administration

Prehospitalization documentation is a challenging task and prone to loss of information, as paramedics operate under disruptive environments requiring their constant attention to the patients.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Margin reflex distance 1 (MRD1), margin reflex distance 2 (MRD2), and levator muscle function (LF) are crucial metrics for ptosis evaluation and management. However, manual measurements of MRD1, MRD2, and LF are time-consuming, subjective, and prone to human error. Smartphone-based artificial intelligence (AI) image processing is a potential solution to overcome these limitations.

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mHealth in the Developing World/LMICs, Underserved Communities, and for Global Health

Text message (ie, short message service, SMS) smoking cessation interventions have demonstrated efficacy in high-income countries but are less well studied in low- and middle-income countries, including Vietnam.

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Reviews

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a prevalent mental health problem with serious adverse consequences for affected women and their infants. Clinical trials have found that telehealth interventions for women with PPD result in increased accessibility and improved treatment effectiveness. However, no comprehensive synthesis of evidence from clinical trials by systematic review has been conducted.

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mHealth in a Clinical Setting

Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) are stressful, high-stake events that are associated with low survival rates. Acute stress experienced in this situation is associated with lower cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance in calculating drug dosages by emergency medical services. Children are particularly vulnerable to such errors. To date, no app has been validated to specifically support emergency drug preparation by paramedics through reducing the stress level of this procedure and medication errors.

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Quality Evaluation and Descriptive Analysis/Reviews of Multiple Existing Mobile Apps

A range of mobile apps for anxiety have been developed in response to the high prevalence of anxiety disorders. Although the number of publicly available apps for anxiety is increasing, attrition rates among mobile apps are high. These apps must be engaging and relevant to end users to be effective; thus, engagement features and the ability to tailor delivery to the needs of individual users are key. However, our understanding of the functionality of these apps concerning engagement and tailoring features is limited.

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