JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 4.77

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor: 4.77) is a leading peer-reviewed journal and one of the flagship journals of JMIR Publications. JMIR mHealth and uHealth has published since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal indexed in PubMed. In June 2021, JMU received an impact factor of 4.77.

JMU has a focus on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics. It has a broad scope that includes papers which are more technical or more formative/developmental than what would be published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

JMIR mHealth and uHealth adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs (ready for deposit in PubMed Central/PubMed).

Recent Articles

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Musculoskeletal symptoms such as neck and shoulder pain/stiffness and low back pain are common health problems in the working population. They are the leading causes of presenteeism (employees being physically present at work but unable to be fully engaged). Recently, digital interventions have begun to be used to manage health but their effectiveness has not yet been fully verified, and adherence to such programs is always a problem.

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Text-messaging (SMS, WeChat etc)-Based Interventions

Self-management of lifestyle and cardiovascular disease risk factors is challenging in older patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). SMS text messaging could be a potential support tool for self-management and the most affordable and accessible method through a mobile phone. High-quality evidence had been lacking, and previous studies evaluated the effects of SMS text messaging on the subjective measures of short-term outcomes. Recently, a large-sized randomized controlled trial in Australia reported promising findings on the objective measures upon 6-month follow-up. However, an examination of the effectiveness of such interventions in an Asian population with unique demographic characteristics would be worthwhile.

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mHealth in the Developing World/LMICs, Underserved Communities, and for Global Health

Health workers have traditionally delivered health promotion and education to rural communities in the Global South in paper leaflet formats or orally. With the rise of digital technologies, health promotion and education can be provided in innovative and more effective formats, which are believed to have a higher impact on disease prevention and treatment.

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Reviews

Controlling blood pressure (BP) is an international health concern, and high BP is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease mortality. Evidence has shown that educational interventions directed at patients potentially improve BP control and adherence to medications and lifestyle modifications. In addition, a text messaging intervention has a potential effect on BP control; however, the dosage of a text messaging intervention has not been determined in previous reviews, resulting in difficult application in practice.

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Quality Evaluation and Descriptive Analysis/Reviews of Multiple Existing Mobile Apps

The wide use of mobile health apps has created new possibilities in social anxiety education and treatment. However, the content and quality of social anxiety apps have been quite unclear, which makes it difficult for people to choose appropriate apps to use on smartphones and tablets.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

App-based treatment for urinary incontinence is a proven effective and cost-effective alternative to care as usual, but successful implementation requires that we identify and address the barriers and facilitators associated with app use.

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Reviews

Mood disorders are commonly underrecognized and undertreated, as diagnosis is reliant on self-reporting and clinical assessments that are often not timely. Speech characteristics of those with mood disorders differs from healthy individuals. With the wide use of smartphones, and the emergence of machine learning approaches, smartphones can be used to monitor speech patterns to help the diagnosis and monitoring of mood disorders.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Gingivitis is a nonpainful, inflammatory condition that can be managed at home. Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to tooth loss. Periodic dental examinations are important for early diagnosis and treatment of gum diseases. To contain the spread of the coronavirus, governments, including in Israel, have restricted movements of their citizens which might have caused routine dental checkups to be postponed.

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mHealth in the Developing World/LMICs, Underserved Communities, and for Global Health

The in-service training of frontline health workers (FHWs) in primary health care facilities plays an important role in improving the standard of health care delivery. However, it is often expensive and requires FHWs to leave their posts in rural areas to attend courses in urban centers. This study reports the implementation of a digital health tool for providing video training (VTR) on maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) care to provide in-service training at scale without interrupting health services. The VTR intervention was supported by satellite communications technology and existing 3G mobile networks.

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Wearable Devices and Sensors

A construction method has emerged in which a camera is installed around a construction machine, and the operator remotely controls the machine while synchronizing the vibration of the machine with the images seen from the operator's seat using virtual reality (VR) technology. Indices related to changes in heart rate (HR) and physical vibration, such as heart rate variability (HRV) and multiscale entropy (MSE), can then be measured among the operators. As these indices are quantitative measures of autonomic regulation in the cardiovascular system, they can provide a useful means of assessing operational stress.

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mHealth in a Clinical Setting

Mobile health (mHealth) may improve pediatric weight management capacity and the geographical reach of services, and overcome barriers to attending physical appointments using ubiquitous devices such as smartphones and tablets. This field remains an emerging research area with some evidence of its effectiveness; however, there is a scarcity of literature describing economic evaluations of mHealth interventions.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects more than 165,000 individuals younger than 20 years in the United States of America. The transition from parent management to parent-child team management, with the child taking on increased levels of self-care, can be stressful and is associated with a deterioration in self-management behaviors. Therefore, a mobile app intervention, MyT1DHero, was designed to facilitate diabetes-specific positive parent-adolescent communication and improve diabetes-related outcomes. The MyT1DHero intervention links an adolescent with T1D and their parent through 2 separate app interfaces and is designed to promote positive communication regarding T1D management.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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