JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 4.31

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor 4.31) is a sister journal of JMIR, the leading eHealth journal. JMIR mHealth and uHealth is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, MEDLINE and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and in June 2020 received an Impact Factor of 4.31, ranking the journal Q1 in the medical informatics category indexed by the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) by Clarivate

The journal focusses on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics.

JMIR mHealth and uHealth has published since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal in PubMed. It publishes even faster and has a broader scope including papers which are more technical or more formative/developmental than what would be published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research

JMIR mHealth and uHealth features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting and professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

Recent Articles

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Security and Privacy of mHealth and uHealth

Mobile health (mHealth) apps have gained significant popularity over the last few years due to their tremendous benefits, such as lowering health care costs and increasing patient awareness. However, the sensitivity of health care data makes the security of mHealth apps a serious concern. Poor security practices and lack of security knowledge on the developers’ side can cause several vulnerabilities in mHealth apps.

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mHealth in a Clinical Setting

Currently, high-speed digital imaging (HSDI), especially endoscopic HSDI, is routinely used for the diagnosis of vocal cord disorders. However, endoscopic HSDI devices are usually large and costly, which limits access to patients in underdeveloped countries and in regions with inadequate medical infrastructure. Modern smartphones have sufficient functionality to process the complex calculations that are required for processing high-resolution images and videos with a high frame rate. Recently, several attempts have been made to integrate medical endoscopes with smartphones to make them more accessible to people in underdeveloped countries.

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mHealth for Rehabilitation

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a rapid shift from center-based rehabilitation to telerehabilitation for chronic respiratory disease and lung transplantation due to infection control precautions. Clinical experience with this delivery model on a large scale has not been described.

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mHealth for Data Collection and Research

Self-report assessments for elderly drivers are used in various countries for accessible, widespread self-monitoring of driving ability in the elderly population. Likewise, in South Korea, a paper-based Self-Report Assessment for Elderly Driving Risk (SAFE-DR) has been developed. Here, we implemented the SAFE-DR through an Android app, which provides the advantages of accessibility, convenience, and provision of diverse information, and verified its reliability and validity.

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Text-messaging (SMS, WeChat etc)-Based Interventions

Addiction to opiates and synthetic opioids poses a major threat to public health worldwide, with pharmaceutical opioids prescribed to manage pain constituting the main problem. To counteract this threat, suitable pain management strategies should be implemented in health care. Monitoring pain management seems to be feasible using telemedicine with a certain degree of resource intensity and digitization. As a communication channel for this type of monitoring, SMS appears to be a valid alternative.

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mHealth in the Developing World/LMICs, Underserved Communities, and for Global Health

Nonattendance at vaccination appointments is a big challenge for health workers as it is difficult to track routine vaccination schedules. In Ethiopia, 3 out of 10 children have incomplete vaccination and the timely receipt of the recommended vaccines is low. Thus, innovative strategies are required to reach the last mile where mobile technology can be effectively utilized to achieve better compliance. Despite this promising technology, little is known about the role of text message–based mobile health interventions in improving the complete and timely receipt of routine childhood vaccinations in Ethiopia.

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Quality Evaluation and Descriptive Analysis/Reviews of Multiple Existing Mobile Apps

As a computerized drug–drug interaction (DDI) alert system has not been widely implemented in China, health care providers are relying on mobile health (mHealth) apps as references for checking drug information, including DDIs.

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mHealth for Treatment Adherence

Adherence to treatment is critical for successful treatment outcomes. Although factors influencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence vary, young adults are less likely to adhere owing to psychosocial issues such as stigma, ART-related side effects, and a lack of access to treatment. The Call for Life Uganda (CFLU) mobile health (mHealth) tool is a mobile phone–based technology that provides text messages or interactive voice response functionalities through a web interface and offers 4 modules of support.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Low back pain is one of the most common health problems and a main cause of disability, which imposes a great burden on patients. Mobile health (mHealth) affects many aspects of people’s lives, and it has progressed rapidly, showing promise as an effective intervention for patients with low back pain. However, the efficacy of mHealth interventions for patients with low back pain remains unclear; thus, further exploration is necessary.

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Viewpoint

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated unprecedented and sustained health management challenges worldwide. Health care systems continue to struggle to support the needs of the majority of infected individuals that are either asymptomatic or have mild symptoms. In addition, long-term effects in the form of long-lasting COVID-19 symptoms or widespread mental health issues aggravated by the pandemic pose a burden on health care systems worldwide. This viewpoint article considers aspects of digital health care solutions and how they can play an ongoing role in safely addressing gaps in the health care support available from initially and repeatedly overwhelmed providers and systems. Digital solutions can be readily designed to address this need and can be flexible enough to adapt to the evolving management requirements of various stakeholders to reduce COVID-19 infection rates, acute hospitalizations, and mortality. Multiplatform solutions provide a hybrid model of care, which can include mobile and online platforms accompanied by direct clinician input and feedback. Desirable components to be included are discussed, including symptom tracking, patient education, well-being support, and bidirectional communication between patients and clinicians. Customizable and scalable digital health platforms not only can be readily adapted to further meet the needs of employers and public health stakeholders during the ongoing pandemic, but also hold relevance for flexibly meeting broader care management needs into the future.

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Digital Biomarkers and Digital Phenotyping

Population aging is posing multiple social and economic challenges to society. One such challenge is the social and economic burden related to increased health care expenditure caused by early institutionalizations. The use of modern pervasive computing technology makes it possible to continuously monitor the health status of community-dwelling older adults at home. Early detection of health issues through these technologies may allow for reduced treatment costs and initiation of targeted preventive measures leading to better health outcomes. Sleep is a key factor when it comes to overall health and many health issues manifest themselves with associated sleep deteriorations. Sleep quality and sleep disorders such as sleep apnea syndrome have been extensively studied using various wearable devices at home or in the setting of sleep laboratories. However, little research has been conducted evaluating the potential of contactless and continuous sleep monitoring in detecting early signs of health problems in community-dwelling older adults.

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Reviews

Stroke is a common, harmful disease with high recurrence and mortality rates. Uncontrolled blood pressure is an important and changeable risk factor for stroke recurrence. Telemedicine and mobile health (mHealth) interventions may have the potential to facilitate the control of blood pressure among stroke survivors, but their effect has not been established.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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Open Peer Review Period:

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Open Peer Review Period:

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