JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 4.31

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor 4.31) is a sister journal of JMIR, the leading eHealth journal. JMIR mHealth and uHealth is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, MEDLINE and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and in June 2020 received an Impact Factor of 4.31, ranking the journal Q1 in the medical informatics category indexed by the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) by Thomson Reuters/Clarivate

The journal focusses on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics.

JMIR mHealth and uHealth publishes since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal in Pubmed. It publishes even faster and has a broader scope with including papers which are more technical or more formative/developmental than what would be published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research

JMIR mHealth and uHealth features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

JMIR mHealth and uHealth adheres to the same quality standards as JMIR and all articles published here are also cross-listed in the Table of Contents of JMIR, the worlds' leading medical journal in health sciences / health services research and health informatics.

Recent Articles

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mHealth for Treatment Adherence

For the safety monitoring of vaccinations postlicensure, reports of adverse events after immunization (AEFIs) are crucial. New technologies such as digital mobile apps can be used as an active approach to capture these events. We therefore conducted a feasibility study among recipients of the influenza vaccination using an app for assessment of the reporting of AEFIs.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Parents juggling caregiving and paid employment encounter a range of barriers in providing healthy food to their families. Mobile apps have the potential to help parents in planning, purchasing, and preparing healthy family food. The utility and acceptability of apps for supporting parents are unknown. User perspectives of existing technology, such as commercially available apps, can guide the development of evidence-based apps in the future.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Melanoma is attributable to predisposing phenotypical factors, such as skin that easily sunburns and unprotected exposure to carcinogenic UV radiation. Reducing the proportion of young adults who get sunburned may reduce the incidence of melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. Advances in technology have enabled the delivery of real-time UV light exposure and content-relevant health interventions.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Despite a large volume of research on the impact of other digital screens (eg, televisions) on eating behavior, little is known about the nature and impact of mealtime smartphone use.

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Wearable Devices and Sensors

The World Health Organization has projected that by 2030, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) will be the third-leading cause of mortality and the seventh-leading cause of morbidity worldwide. Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are associated with an accelerated decline in lung function, diminished quality of life, and higher mortality. Accurate early detection of acute exacerbations will enable early management and reduce mortality.

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Viewpoint

Heart failure (HF) is a major clinical, social, and economic problem. In view of the important role of fluid overload in the pathogenesis of HF exacerbation, early detection of fluid retention is of key importance in preventing emergency admissions for this reason. However, tools for monitoring volume status that could be widely used in the home setting are still missing. The physical properties of human tissues allow for the use of impedance-based noninvasive methods, whose different modifications are studied in patients with HF for the assessment of body hydration. The aim of this paper is to present the current state of knowledge on the possible applications of these methods for remote (home-based) monitoring of patients with HF.

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Wearable Devices and Sensors

Accurate, objective pain assessment is required in the health care domain and clinical settings for appropriate pain management. Automated, objective pain detection from physiological data in patients provides valuable information to hospital staff and caregivers to better manage pain, particularly for patients who are unable to self-report. Galvanic skin response (GSR) is one of the physiologic signals that refers to the changes in sweat gland activity, which can identify features of emotional states and anxiety induced by varying pain levels. This study used different statistical features extracted from GSR data collected from postoperative patients to detect their pain intensity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work building pain models using postoperative adult patients instead of healthy subjects.

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Fitness Trackers and Smart Pedometers/Accelerometers

Regular physical activity (PA) contributes to the primary and secondary prevention of several chronic diseases and reduces the risk of premature death. Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and a variety of chronic disorders such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension, bone and joint diseases (eg, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis), depression, and colon and breast cancer. Population aging and the related increase in chronic diseases have a major impact on the health care systems of most Western countries and will produce an even more significant effect in the future. Monitoring PA is a valuable method of determining whether people are performing enough PA so as to prevent chronic diseases or are showing early symptoms of those diseases.

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Wearable Devices and Sensors

Research has shown the feasibility of human activity recognition using wearable accelerometer devices. Different studies have used varying numbers and placements for data collection using sensors.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Decreasing trends in the number of individuals accessing face-to-face support are leaving a significant gap in the treatment options for smokers seeking to quit. Face-to-face behavioral support and other interventions attempt to target psychological factors such as the self-efficacy and motivation to quit of smokers, as these factors are associated with an increased likelihood of making quit attempts and successfully quitting. Although digital interventions, such as smoking cessation mobile apps, could provide a promising avenue to bridge the growing treatment gap, little is known about their impact on psychological factors that are vital for smoking cessation.

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Ubiquitous Health (uHealth)

Smart scales are increasingly used at home by patients to monitor their body weight and body composition, but scale accuracy has not often been documented.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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