JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 5.0

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor: 5.0) is a leading peer-reviewed journal and one of the flagship journals of JMIR Publications. JMU has been published since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal indexed in PubMed. In June 2023, JMU received a Journal Impact Factor™ from Clarivate of 5.0 (5-year Journal Impact Factor™: 5.7) and continues to be a Q1 journal in the category of ‘Healthcare Sciences and Services.’ It is indexed in all major literature indices, including MEDLINE, PubMedPubMed Central, Scopus, Psycinfo, SCIE, JCR, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others.

JMU focuses on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics. 

The journal adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, and professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

Like all JMIR journals, JMU encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages the publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee when publishing a subsequent results paper in any JMIR journal.

Recent Articles

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

In the modern world, mobile apps are essential for human advancement, and pandemic control is no exception. The use of mobile apps and technology for the detection and diagnosis of COVID-19 has been the subject of numerous investigations, although no thorough analysis of COVID-19 pandemic prevention has been conducted using mobile apps, creating a gap.

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Quality Evaluation and Descriptive Analysis/Reviews of Multiple Existing Mobile Apps

As Chinese society ages and concern for health and quality of life grows, the demand for care services is increasing. The widespread use of Internet technology has greatly improved the convenience and efficiency of online services. As a result, the Chinese government has been implementing “Internet + Nursing Service” since 2019, with mobile Apps being the primary way for users to access these services. The quality of these Apps is closely related to user experience and the smooth use of services.

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Usability of Apps and User Perceptions of mHealth

As smart speakers become more popular, there have been an increasing number of studies on how they may benefit older adults or how older adults perceive them. Despite the increasing ownership rates of smart speakers among older adults, studies that examine their integration and the long-term use in older adults’ daily practices are scarce.

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mHealth in a Clinical Setting

Hearing rehabilitation with auditory training (AT) is necessary to improve speech perception ability in patients with hearing loss. However, face-to-face AT has not been widely implemented due to its high cost and manpower requirements. Therefore, there is a need for the development of a patient-friendly mobile-based AT program.

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Evaluation and Research Methodology for mHealth

People living with and beyond breast cancer can face internal barriers to physical activity (eg, fatigue and pain). Digital interventions that promote psychological acceptance and motivation may help this population navigate these barriers. The degree to which individuals (1) adhere to intervention protocols and (2) reflect on and internalize intervention content may predict intervention efficacy.

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mHealth for Data Collection and Research

In the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey, dietary intake has been assessed since 2003 through 24-hour dietary recalls using the GloboDiet software. A new self-administered smartphone food record app called DitEetIk! was developed for potential use in future surveys.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

Smart home technology (SHT) can be useful for aging in place or health-related purposes. However, surveillance studies have highlighted ethical issues with SHTs, including user privacy, security, and autonomy.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

The Health eLiteracy for Prevention in General Practice trial is a primary health care–based behavior change intervention for weight loss in Australians who are overweight and those with obesity from lower socioeconomic areas. Individuals from these areas are known to have low levels of health literacy and are particularly at risk for chronic conditions, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The intervention comprised health check visits with a practice nurse, a purpose-built patient-facing mobile app (mysnapp), and a referral to telephone coaching.

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Economic Evaluations of mHealth Programs and Infrastructures

Many patients with chronic heart failure (HF) experience a reduced health status, leading to readmission after hospitalization despite receiving conventional care. Telemonitoring approaches aim to improve the early detection of HF decompensations and prevent readmissions. However, knowledge about the impact of telemonitoring on preventing readmissions and related costs remains scarce.

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Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA)

As mobile health (mHealth) studies become increasingly productive owing to the advancements in wearable and mobile sensor technology, our ability to monitor and model human behavior will be constrained by participant receptivity. Many health constructs are dependent on subjective responses, and without such responses, researchers are left with little to no ground truth to accompany our ever-growing biobehavioral data. This issue can significantly impact the quality of a study, particularly for populations known to exhibit lower compliance rates. To address this challenge, researchers have proposed innovative approaches that use machine learning (ML) and sensor data to modify the timing and delivery of surveys. However, an overarching concern is the potential introduction of biases or unintended influences on participants’ responses when implementing new survey delivery methods.

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mHealth in a Clinical Setting

To cope with the rising number of patients with trauma in an already constrained Dutch health care system, Direct Discharge (DD) has been introduced in over 25 hospitals in the Netherlands since 2019. With DD, no routine follow-up appointments are scheduled after the emergency department (ED) visit, and patients are supported through information leaflets, a smartphone app, and a telephone helpline. DD reduces secondary health care use, with comparable patient satisfaction and primary health care use. Currently, little is known about the experiences of in-hospital health care professionals with DD.

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Quality Evaluation and Descriptive Analysis/Reviews of Multiple Existing Mobile Apps

With the rapid development of mobile health (mHealth) technology, many health apps have been introduced to the commercial market for people with back pain conditions. However, little is known about their content, quality, approaches to care for low back pain (LBP), and associated risks of use.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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