JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 4.31

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor 4.31) is a sister journal of JMIR, the leading eHealth journal. JMIR mHealth and uHealth is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, MEDLINE and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and in June 2020 received an Impact Factor of 4.31, ranking the journal Q1 in the medical informatics category indexed by the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) by Thomson Reuters/Clarivate

The journal focusses on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics.

JMIR mHealth and uHealth publishes since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal in Pubmed. It publishes even faster and has a broader scope with including papers which are more technical or more formative/developmental than what would be published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research

JMIR mHealth and uHealth features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

JMIR mHealth and uHealth adheres to the same quality standards as JMIR and all articles published here are also cross-listed in the Table of Contents of JMIR, the worlds' leading medical journal in health sciences / health services research and health informatics.

Recent Articles

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mHealth for Telemedicine and Homecare

The COVID-19 pandemic has acted as a catalyst for the development and adoption of a broad range of remote monitoring technologies (RMTs) in health care delivery. It is important to demonstrate how these technologies were implemented during the early stages of this pandemic to identify their application and barriers to adoption, particularly among vulnerable populations.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Adolescence is a life stage characterized by intense development and increased vulnerability. Yet, young people rarely seek help for mental health, often due to stigma and embarrassment. Alarmingly, even those who do seek help may not be able to receive it. Interventions focused on well-being offer a protective factor against adversity. Highly effective, innovative, theoretically sound, accessible, and engaging mobile health (mHealth) interventions that can be used to look beyond mental ill-health and toward mental well-being are urgently needed.

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Evaluation and Research Methodology for mHealth

There is a huge number of health-related apps available, and the numbers are growing fast. However, many of them have been developed without any kind of quality control. In an attempt to contribute to the development of high-quality apps and enable existing apps to be assessed, several guides have been developed.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Although fatigue is one of the most debilitating symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), its pathogenesis is not well understood. Neurogenic, inflammatory, endocrine, and metabolic mechanisms have been proposed. Taking into account the temporal dynamics and comorbid mood symptoms of fatigue may help differentiate fatigue phenotypes. These phenotypes may reflect different pathogeneses and may respond to different mechanism-specific treatments. Although several tools have been developed to assess various symptoms (including fatigue), monitor clinical status, or improve the perceived level of fatigue in patients with MS, options for a detailed, real-time assessment of MS-related fatigue and relevant comorbidities are still limited.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Drug use disorder has high potential for relapse and imposes an enormous burden on public health in China. Since the promulgation of the Anti-drug law in 2008, community-based rehabilitation has become the primary approach to treat drug addiction. However, multiple problems occurred in the implementation process, leading to a low detoxification rate in the community. Mobile health (mHealth) serves as a promising tool to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of community-based rehabilitation. Community-based addiction rehabilitation electronic system (CAREs) is an interactive system for drug users and their assigned social workers.

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Design and Formative Evaluation of Mobile Apps

Breastfeeding plays a major role in the health of mothers and babies and has the potential to positively shape an individual’s life both in the short and long term. In the United Kingdom (UK), although 81% of women initiate breastfeeding, only 1% of women breastfeed exclusively to 6 months as recommended by the World Health Organization. In the UK, women who are socially disadvantaged and younger are less likely to breastfeed at 6 to 8 weeks postpartum. One strategy that aims to improve these statistics is the Baby Buddy app, which has been designed and implemented by the UK charity Best Beginnings to be a universal intervention to help reduce health inequalities, including those in breastfeeding.

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mHealth for Rehabilitation

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia after cardiac surgery, yet the precise incidence and significance of arrhythmias after discharge home need to be better defined. Photoplethysmography (PPG)-based smartphone apps are promising tools to enable early detection and follow-up of arrhythmias.

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Fitness Trackers and Smart Pedometers/Accelerometers

Physical activity (PA) is a modifiable lifestyle factor that can be targeted to increase energy expenditure and promote weight loss. However, the amount of PA required for weight loss remains inconsistent. Wearable activity trackers constitute a valuable opportunity to obtain objective measurements of PA and study large populations in real-life settings.

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Text-messaging (SMS, WeChat etc)-Based Interventions

In March 2020, Text4Hope—a community health service—was provided to Alberta residents. This free service aims to promote psychological resilience and alleviate pandemic-associated stress, anxiety, and depression symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Design and Formative Evaluation of Mobile Apps

In emergencies, language barriers may have dangerous consequences for the patients. There have been some technical approaches to overcome language barriers in medical care but not yet in the prehospital emergency care setting. The use of digital technologies in health care is expanding rapidly. Involving end users at all stages of the development process may help to ensure such technologies are usable and can be implemented.

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Viewpoint

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic genetic disease that requires lifelong therapy and monitoring. Low drug adherence and poor monitoring may lead to an increase in morbidities and low quality of life. In the era of digital technology, various mobile health (mHealth) apps are being tested for their potential in increasing drug adherence in patients with SCD. We herewith discuss the applicability and feasibility of these mHealth apps for the management of SCD in India.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Heart failure (HF) remains a major public health challenge, while HF self-care is particularly challenging. Mobile health (mHealth)–based interventions taking advantage of smartphone technology have shown particular promise in increasing the quality of self-care among these patients, and in turn improving the outcomes of their disease.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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