JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 4.31

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor 4.31) is a sister journal of JMIR, the leading eHealth journal. JMIR mHealth and uHealth is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, MEDLINE and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and in June 2020 received an Impact Factor of 4.31, ranking the journal Q1 in the medical informatics category indexed by the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) by Clarivate

The journal focusses on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics.

JMIR mHealth and uHealth has published since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal in PubMed. It publishes even faster and has a broader scope including papers which are more technical or more formative/developmental than what would be published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research

JMIR mHealth and uHealth features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting and professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

Recent Articles

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Text-messaging (SMS, WeChat etc)-Based Interventions

Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of hospital admission in North America. Many patients with ACS experience challenges after discharge that impact their clinical outcomes and psychosocial well-being. SMS text messaging has the potential to provide support to patients during this postdischarge period.

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Design and Formative Evaluation of Mobile Apps

Pain-related mobile apps targeting pain assessment commonly limit pain assessment to pain behaviors and physiological aspects. However, current guidelines state that pain assessment should follow the biopsychosocial model, clearly addressing biological, psychological, and social aspects of the pain experience. Existing reviews also highlight that pain specialists and end users are not commonly involved in the development process of mobile apps for pain assessment, negatively affecting the quality of the available apps.

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Quality Evaluation and Descriptive Analysis/Reviews of Multiple Existing Mobile Apps

The mobile app market differs from country to country, and to date, no previous review of the content quality of smoking cessation apps has been conducted in France.

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mHealth for Data Collection and Research

Advances in smartphone technology have facilitated an increase in the number of commercially available smartphone and tablet apps that enable the collection of physiological and biomechanical variables typically monitored in sport and exercise settings. Currently, it is not fully understood whether individuals collect data using mobile devices and tablets, independent of additional hardware, in their practice.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Mobile health apps are becoming increasingly popular, and they provide opportunities for effective health management. Existing chronic disease management (CDM) apps cannot meet users’ practical and urgent needs, and user adhesion is poor. Few studies, however, have investigated the factors that influence the continuance intention of CDM app users.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Dietary interventions can improve pregnancy outcomes among women with increased BMI. Although the interest in mobile health interventions is growing, little is known about the acceptability of smartphone apps to support lifestyle interventions in such a cohort.

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Use and User Demographics of mHealth

The last decade has seen a substantial increase in the use of mobile health apps and research into the effects of those apps on health and health behaviors. In parallel, research has aimed at identifying population subgroups that are more likely to use those health apps. Current evidence is limited by two issues. First, research has focused on broad health apps, and little is known about app usage for a specific health behavior. Second, research has focused on comparing current users and current nonusers, without considering subgroups of nonusers.

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mHealth for Data Collection and Research

During the second wave of COVID-19 in August 2020, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government implemented public health and social measures to reduce on-site dining. Assessing the associations between human behavior, infection, and social measures is essential to understand achievable reductions in cases and identify the factors driving changes in social dynamics.

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Reviews

Continuous monitoring of patient vital signs may improve patient outcomes. Head-worn displays (HWDs) can provide hands-free access to continuous vital sign information of patients in critical and acute care contexts and thus may reduce instances of unrecognized patient deterioration.

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Textile Sensors and Smart Textiles

Electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring in daily life is essential for effective management of cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of death. Wearable ECG measurement systems in the form of clothing have been proposed to replace Holter monitors used for clinical ECG monitoring; however, they have limitations in daily use because they compress the upper body and, in doing so, cause discomfort during wear.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Limited English proficiency (LEP) is an important driver of health disparities. Many successful patient-level interventions to prevent chronic disease progression and complications have used automated telephone self-management support, which relies on patient activation and communication to achieve improved health outcomes. It is not clear whether these interventions are similarly applicable to patients with LEP compared to patients with English proficiency.

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Design and Formative Evaluation of Mobile Apps

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most common complication during pregnancy and is associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiometabolic diseases. Behavioral interventions can reduce this risk, but current solutions insufficiently address the requirements for such a program. The systematic development of a scalable mobile health (mHealth) promotion program for mothers during the first years post-GDM may contribute to solving this problem.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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