JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 5.0

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor: 5.0) is a leading peer-reviewed journal and one of the flagship journals of JMIR Publications. JMU has been published since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal indexed in PubMed. In June 2023, JMU received a Journal Impact Factor™ from Clarivate of 5.0 (5-year Journal Impact Factor™: 5.7) and continues to be a Q1 journal in the category of ‘Healthcare Sciences and Services.’ It is indexed in all major literature indices, including MEDLINE, PubMedPubMed Central, Scopus, Psycinfo, SCIE, JCR, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others.

JMU focuses on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics. 

The journal adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, and professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

Like all JMIR journals, JMU encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages the publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee when publishing a subsequent results paper in any JMIR journal.

Recent Articles

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Evaluation and Research Methodology for mHealth

Accurately assessing an individual’s diet is vital in the management of personal nutrition and in the study of the effect of diet on health. Despite its importance, the tools available for dietary assessment remain either too imprecise, expensive, or burdensome for clinical or research use. Image-based methods offer a potential new tool to improve the reliability and accessibility of dietary assessment. Though promising, image-based methods are sensitive to adherence, as images cannot be captured from meals that have already been consumed. Adherence to image-based methods may be improved with appropriately timed prompting via text message.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

Past few years has witnessed a burgeoning interest in applying gamification to promote desired health behaviors. However, little is known about the effectiveness of such applications in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention and care continuum among men who have sex with men (MSM).

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

In patients with gout, suboptimal management refers to a lack of disease knowledge, low treatment compliance, and inadequate control of serum uric acid levels. Several studies have shown that continuous care is recommended for disease management in patients with gout. However, in China, the continuous care model commonly used for gout patients requires significant labor and time costs, and its efficiency and coverage remain low, and mHealth seems to address these issues.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

The opioid crisis continues to pose significant challenges to global public health, necessitating the development of novel interventions to support individuals in managing their substance use and preventing overdose-related deaths. Mobile health (mHealth), as a promising platform for addressing opioid use disorder, requires a comprehensive understanding of user perspectives to minimize barriers to care and optimize the benefits of mHealth interventions.

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mHealth in the Developing World/LMICs, Underserved Communities, and for Global Health

Promoting physical activity (PA) and healthy feeding (HF) is crucial to address the alarming increase in obesity rates in developing countries. Leveraging mobile phones for behavior change communication to encourage infant PA and promote HF is particularly significant within the Mexican context.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

Telemedicine technology is a rapidly developing field that demonstrates immense potential in improving medical services. In palliative care, informal caregivers assume the primary responsibility in patient care and often face challenges such as increased physical and mental stress, and declining health. In such cases, telemedicine interventions can provide support and improve their health outcomes. However, research findings regarding the use of telemedicine among informal caregivers are controversial, and its efficacy remains unclear.

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Text-messaging (SMS, WeChat etc)-Based Interventions

The effectiveness of timely medication, physical activity (PA), a healthy diet, and blood pressure (BP) monitoring for promoting health outcomes and behavioral changes among patients with hypertension is supported by a substantial amount of literature, with “adherence” playing a pivotal role. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consistent evidence regarding whether digital interventions can improve adherence to healthy behaviors among individuals with hypertension.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

Wearable devices, mobile technologies, and their combination have been accepted into clinical use to better assess the physical fitness and quality of life of patients and as preventive measures. Usability is pivotal for overcoming constraints and gaining users’ acceptance of technology such as wearables and their companion mobile health (mHealth) apps. However, owing to limitations in design and evaluation, interactive wearables and mHealth apps have often been restricted from their full potential.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Metabolic flexibility is the ability of the body to rapidly switch between fuel sources based on their accessibility and metabolic requirements. High metabolic flexibility is associated with improved health outcomes and a reduced risk of several metabolic disorders. Metabolic flexibility can be improved through lifestyle changes, such as increasing physical activity and eating a balanced macronutrient diet. Lumen is a small handheld device that measures metabolic fuel usage through exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2), which allows individuals to monitor their metabolic flexibility and make lifestyle changes to enhance it.

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mHealth in a Clinical Setting

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling disorder associated with high interference in people’s lives. However, patients with OCD either do not seek help or delay seeking help. Research suggests that this could be explained by poor mental health literacy about the disorder and the associated stigma.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Hypertension significantly impacts the well-being and health of individuals globally. Hypertension management apps (HMAs) have been shown to assist patients in controlling blood pressure (BP), with their efficacy validated in clinical trials. However, the utilization of HMAs continues to be suboptimal. Presently, there is a dearth of real-world research based on big data and exploratory mining that compares Chinese and American HMAs.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

Despite being the gold standard method for objectively assessing sleep, polysomnography faces several limitations as it is expensive, time-consuming, labor-intensive, requires various equipment and technical expertise, and is impractical for long-term or in-home use. However, it has been shown that consumer wrist-worn wearables are able to monitor sleep parameters and thus could be used as an alternative for polysomnography. Following this, wearables gained immense popularity over the past few years. However, their accuracy has been a major concern for years.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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