JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 4.95

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor: 4.95) is a leading peer-reviewed journal and one of the flagship journals of JMIR Publications. JMIR mHealth and uHealth has published since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal indexed in PubMed. In June 2022, JMU received a Journal Impact Factor™ from Clarivate of 4.95 (5-year IF: 5.65) and continues to be a Q1 journal in the category of ‘Healthcare Sciences and Services’. It is indexed in all major literature indices including Medline, PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Psycinfo, SCIE, JCR, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others.

JMU has a focus on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics. 

JMIR mHealth and uHealth adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

As all JMIR journals, the journal encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee.

Recent Articles

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

In the United States, almost 90% of women are at risk of at least one chronic condition. However, the awareness, management, and monitoring of these conditions are low and present a substantial public health problem. Digital health tools can be leveraged to reduce the alarmingly high rates of chronic condition–related mortality and morbidity in women.

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Quality Evaluation and Descriptive Analysis/Reviews of Multiple Existing Mobile Apps

The System Usability Scale (SUS) is a widely used scale that has been used to quantify the usability of many software and hardware products. However, the SUS was not specifically designed to evaluate mobile apps, or in particular digital health apps (DHAs).

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Fitness Trackers and Smart Pedometers/Accelerometers

Adolescence is a critical age where steep declines in physical activity and increases in sedentary time occur. Promoting physical activity should therefore be a priority for short- and long-term health benefits. Wearable activity trackers in combination with supportive resources have the potential to influence adolescents’ physical activity levels and sedentary behavior. Examining the pathways through which such interventions work can inform which mediators to target in future studies.

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mHealth for Data Collection and Research

Large gaps exist in understanding the symptomatic and functional impact of sarcoidosis, a rare multisystem granulomatous disease affecting fewer than 200,000 individuals in the United States. Smartphones could be used for prospective research, especially for rare diseases where organizing large cohorts can be challenging, given their near ubiquitous ownership and ability to track objective and subjective data with increasingly sophisticated technology.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

A large number of wearable activity monitor models are released and used each year by consumers and researchers. As more studies are being carried out on children and adolescents in terms of sedentary behavior (SB) assessment, knowledge about accurate and precise monitoring devices becomes increasingly important.

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Wearable Devices and Sensors

Cognitive behavioral therapy–based interventions are effective in reducing prenatal stress, which can have severe adverse health effects on mothers and newborns if unaddressed. Predicting next-day physiological or perceived stress can help to inform and enable pre-emptive interventions for a likely physiologically and perceptibly stressful day. Machine learning models are useful tools that can be developed to predict next-day physiological and perceived stress by using data collected from the previous day. Such models can improve our understanding of the specific factors that predict physiological and perceived stress and allow researchers to develop systems that collect selected features for assessment in clinical trials to minimize the burden of data collection.

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Fitness Trackers and Smart Pedometers/Accelerometers

Given the evolution of processing and analysis methods for accelerometry data over the past decade, it is important to understand how newer summary measures of physical activity compare with established measures.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

Wearables refer to devices that are worn by individuals. In the health care field, wearables may assist with individual monitoring and diagnosis. In fact, the potential for wearable technology to assist with health care has received recognition from health systems around the world, including a place in the strategic Long Term Plan shared by the National Health Service in England. However, wearables are not limited to specialist medical devices used by patients. Leading technology companies, including Apple, have been exploring the capabilities of wearable health technology for health-conscious consumers. Despite advancements in wearable health technology, research is yet to be conducted on wearables and empowerment.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

Self-monitoring of behavior can support lifestyle modifications; however, we do not know whether such interventions are effective in supporting positive changes in hypertension-related health behaviors and thus in reducing blood pressure in patients treated for hypertension.

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Theme Issue: Apps for COVID-19 (#Apps4Covid)

COVID-19 digital contact-tracing apps were created to assist public health authorities in curbing the pandemic. These apps require users’ permission to access specific functions on their mobile phones, such as geolocation, Bluetooth or Wi-Fi connections, or personal data, to work correctly. As these functions have privacy repercussions, it is essential to establish how contact-tracing apps respect users’ privacy.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Research has suggested that there is a mental health crisis occurring among graduate students in the United States. Moreover, many students go without effective treatment owing to the limited availability of mental and behavioral health resources on college campuses. Text-based therapy may represent a viable method for increasing access to mental health support for graduate students, but little is known regarding its acceptability in this population.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Pregnant women are active users of mobile apps for health purposes. These apps may improve self-management of health-related conditions. Up to 70% of pregnant women experience nausea and vomiting (NVP). Even mild NVP can significantly reduce quality of life (QoL), and it can become an economic burden for both the woman and society. NVP often occurs before the first maternal care visit; therefore, apps can potentially play an important role in empowering pregnant women to recognize, manage, and seek appropriate treatment for NVP, when required.

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