JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 4.77

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor: 4.77) is a leading peer-reviewed journal and one of the flagship journals of JMIR Publications. JMIR mHealth and uHealth has published since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal indexed in PubMed. In June 2021, JMU received an impact factor of 4.77.

JMU has a focus on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics. It has a broad scope that includes papers which are more technical or more formative/developmental than what would be published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

JMIR mHealth and uHealth adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs (ready for deposit in PubMed Central/PubMed).

Recent Articles

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

App-based treatment for urinary incontinence is a proven effective and cost-effective alternative to care as usual, but successful implementation requires that we identify and address the barriers and facilitators associated with app use.

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Reviews

Mood disorders are commonly underrecognized and undertreated, as diagnosis is reliant on self-reporting and clinical assessments that are often not timely. Speech characteristics of those with mood disorders differs from healthy individuals. With the wide use of smartphones, and the emergence of machine learning approaches, smartphones can be used to monitor speech patterns to help the diagnosis and monitoring of mood disorders.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Gingivitis is a nonpainful, inflammatory condition that can be managed at home. Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to tooth loss. Periodic dental examinations are important for early diagnosis and treatment of gum diseases. To contain the spread of the coronavirus, governments, including in Israel, have restricted movements of their citizens which might have caused routine dental checkups to be postponed.

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mHealth in the Developing World/LMICs, Underserved Communities, and for Global Health

The in-service training of frontline health workers (FHWs) in primary health care facilities plays an important role in improving the standard of health care delivery. However, it is often expensive and requires FHWs to leave their posts in rural areas to attend courses in urban centers. This study reports the implementation of a digital health tool for providing video training (VTR) on maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) care to provide in-service training at scale without interrupting health services. The VTR intervention was supported by satellite communications technology and existing 3G mobile networks.

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Wearable Devices and Sensors

A construction method has emerged in which a camera is installed around a construction machine, and the operator remotely controls the machine while synchronizing the vibration of the machine with the images seen from the operator's seat using virtual reality (VR) technology. Indices related to changes in heart rate (HR) and physical vibration, such as heart rate variability (HRV) and multiscale entropy (MSE), can then be measured among the operators. As these indices are quantitative measures of autonomic regulation in the cardiovascular system, they can provide a useful means of assessing operational stress.

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mHealth in a Clinical Setting

Mobile health (mHealth) may improve pediatric weight management capacity and the geographical reach of services, and overcome barriers to attending physical appointments using ubiquitous devices such as smartphones and tablets. This field remains an emerging research area with some evidence of its effectiveness; however, there is a scarcity of literature describing economic evaluations of mHealth interventions.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects more than 165,000 individuals younger than 20 years in the United States of America. The transition from parent management to parent-child team management, with the child taking on increased levels of self-care, can be stressful and is associated with a deterioration in self-management behaviors. Therefore, a mobile app intervention, MyT1DHero, was designed to facilitate diabetes-specific positive parent-adolescent communication and improve diabetes-related outcomes. The MyT1DHero intervention links an adolescent with T1D and their parent through 2 separate app interfaces and is designed to promote positive communication regarding T1D management.

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mHealth for Diagnosis

Hearing loss is one of the most common disabilities worldwide and affects both individual and public health. Pure tone audiometry (PTA) is the gold standard for hearing assessment, but it is often not available in many settings, given its high cost and demand for human resources. Smartphone-based audiometry may be equally effective and can improve access to adequate hearing evaluations.

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Use and User Demographics of mHealth

An increasing number of mobile health (mHealth) apps are becoming available for download and use on mobile devices. Even with the increase in availability and use of mHealth apps, there has still not been a lot of research into understanding the intention to use this kind of apps.

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mHealth in Medical Education and Training

Diabetes has placed heavy social and economic burdens on society and families worldwide. Insufficient knowledge and training of frontline medical staff, such as nurses, interns, and residents, may lead to an increase in acute and chronic complications among patients with diabetes. However, interns have insufficient knowledge about diabetes management. The factors that affect interns’ current level of diabetes-related knowledge are still unclear. Therefore, understanding the behavioral intentions of interns is essential to supporting the development and promotion of the use of virtual simulation teaching applications.

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mHealth in the Developing World/LMICs, Underserved Communities, and for Global Health

Smartphones have become an integral part of our lives with unprecedented popularity and a diverse selection of apps. The continuous upgrading of information technology has also enabled smartphones to display great potential in the field of health care.

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Theme Issue 2020-2021: Apps for COVID-19 (#Apps4Covid)

For mobile app–based COVID-19 contact tracing to be fully effective, a large majority of the population needs to be using the app on an ongoing basis. However, there is a paucity of studies of users, as opposed to potential adopters, of mobile contact tracing apps and of their experiences. New Zealand, a high-income country with western political culture, was successful in managing the COVID-19 pandemic, and its experience is valuable for informing policy responses in similar contexts.

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