JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Mobile and tablet apps, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, wearable computing, and domotics for health

Editor-in-Chief:

Lorraine R. Buis, PhD, MSI, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, USA


Impact Factor 4.95

JMIR mHealth and uHealth (JMU, ISSN 2291-5222; Impact Factor: 4.95) is a leading peer-reviewed journal and one of the flagship journals of JMIR Publications. JMIR mHealth and uHealth has published since 2013 and was the first mhealth journal indexed in PubMed. In June 2022, JMU received a Journal Impact Factor™ from Clarivate of 4.95 (5-year Journal Impact Factor™: 5.65) and continues to be a Q1 journal in the category of ‘Healthcare Sciences and Services’. It is indexed in all major literature indices including Medline, PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Psycinfo, SCIE, JCR, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others.

JMU has a focus on health and biomedical applications in mobile and tablet computing, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, wearable computing and domotics. 

JMIR mHealth and uHealth adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

As all JMIR journals, the journal encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee.

Recent Articles

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Fitness Trackers and Smart Pedometers/Accelerometers

Physical inactivity is associated with numerous health risks, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, increased health care expenditure, and preventable, premature deaths. The majority of Americans fall short of clinical guideline goals (ie, 8000-10,000 steps per day). Behavior prediction algorithms could enable efficacious interventions to promote physical activity by facilitating delivery of nudges at appropriate times.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

A growing body of evidence shows that financial incentives can effectively reinforce individuals’ positive behavior change and improve compliance with health intervention programs. A critical factor in the design of incentive-based interventions is to set a proper incentive magnitude. However, it is highly challenging to determine such magnitudes as the effects of incentive magnitude depend on personal attitudes and contexts.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

The World Health Organization recommends that all adults with HIV adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Good adherence to ART is beneficial to patients and the public. Furthermore, mHealth has shown promise in improving HIV medication adherence globally.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Overweight and obesity have been linked to several serious health problems and medical conditions. With more than a quarter of the young population having weight problems, the impacts of overweight and obesity on this age group are particularly critical. Mobile health (mHealth) apps that support and encourage positive health behaviors have the potential to achieve better health outcomes. These apps represent a unique opportunity for young people (age range 10-24 years), for whom mobile phones are an indispensable part of their everyday living. However, despite the potential of mHealth apps for improved engagement in health interventions, user adherence to these health interventions in the long term is low.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

Cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and obesity are common chronic diseases, and their prevalence is reaching an epidemic level worldwide. As the impact of chronic diseases continues to increase, finding strategies to improve care, access to care, and patient empowerment becomes increasingly essential. Health care providers use mobile health (mHealth) to access clinical information, collaborate with care teams, communicate over long distances with patients, and facilitate real-time monitoring and interventions. However, these apps focus on improving general health care concerns, with limited apps focusing on specific chronic diseases and the nutrition involved in the disease state. Hence, available evidence on the effectiveness of mHealth apps toward behavior change to improve chronic disease outcomes is limited.

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mHealth for Symptom and Disease Monitoring, Chronic Disease Management

Tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) is a standard treatment for tinnitus that consists of directive counseling and sound therapy. However, it is based on face-to-face education and a time-consuming protocol. Smart device–based TRT (smart-TRT) seems to have many advantages, but the efficacy of this new treatment has been questioned.

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Usability of Apps and User Perceptions of mHealth

Despite their prevalence and reported patient interest in their use, uptake of health-related apps is limited. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has developed a variety of apps to support veterans; however, uptake remains low nationally.

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Use and User Demographics of mHealth

Knowledge of the characteristics of adolescents who use mobile health (mHealth) apps to monitor health and how these characteristics differ from those of app nonusers is limited.

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Wearables and MHealth Reviews

Midlife women with menopausal symptoms are less likely to meet the recommended level of physical activity (PA). Promoting PA among women in midlife could reduce their risk of cardiovascular diseases and perhaps improve menopausal symptoms. Mobile PA interventions in the form of smartphone apps and wearable activity trackers can potentially encourage users to increase PA levels and address time and resource barriers to PA. However, evidence on the acceptability and effectiveness of these interventions among midlife women is unclear.

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Quality Evaluation and Descriptive Analysis/Reviews of Multiple Existing Mobile Apps

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly dynamic and individualized disease in terms of its patterns of symptomatic flare-ups and periods of remission. Patient-centered care (PCC) aligns patients’ lifestyle goals with their preferences for managing symptoms and side effects through the selection of therapies appropriate for disease management. Mobile health (mHealth) apps have the potential to engage and activate patients in PCC. mHealth apps can provide features that increase disease knowledge, collect patient-generated health indicators and behavioral metrics, and highlight goals for disease management. However, little evidence-based guidance exists as to which apps contain functionality essential for supporting the delivery of PCC.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Coronary artery disease is the main cause of death and loss of disability-adjusted life years worldwide. Information and communication technology has become an important part of health care systems, including the innovative cardiac rehabilitation services through mobile phone and mobile health (mHealth) interventions.

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mHealth for Wellness, Behavior Change and Prevention

Musculoskeletal conditions are among the main contributors to the global burden of disease. International guidelines consider patient education and movement exercises as the preferred therapeutic option for unspecific and degenerative musculoskeletal conditions. Innovative and decentralized therapeutic means are required to provide access to and availability of such care to meet the increasing therapeutic demand for this spectrum of conditions.

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